Coming Up

October 22nd Show

We begin our week with guest host Lynn Neary. Neal Conan will be back in the host's chair tomorrow. Here's what we're focusing on today:

In our first hour, we will talk about last week's 7-2 vote in Maine that allows the distribution of prescription birth control to students at King Middle School without their parents permission. This decision has sparked heavy debate. Middle school students fall between the ages of 11 and 15. Is this age group simply too young for the pill? We'll discuss the controversy surrounding birth control in schools, and hear from a Portland school board committee member who voted in favor of providing birth control pills to middle schoolers, and a former school nurse who is against the policy. Tell us your thoughts. How young is too young for birth control? Following that discussion, we'll talk to Mary Callahan about her op-ed in last week's Los Angeles Times. In the article, entitled "Mercenary Motherhood," she shares her experience as a foster parent, and what happened when her foster child discovered that she received money for parenting him. Callahan will explain how that has lead her to believe that financial compensation for foster parents has broken the foster care system.

In our second hour, we'll talk with NASA astronaut Barbara Morgan about becoming the first teacher in orbit aboard the shuttle Endeavour in August, and answer your questions about the process leading up to the flight and, after a more than twenty-year wait, was seeing the world from space everything she imagined it would be. Following that, we'll answer your questions about "rendition," the practice Daniel Benjamin defines as "moving someone from one country to another, outside the formal process of extradition," and, "a key tool for getting terrorists from places where they're causing trouble to places where they can't." It's also the subject of a new motion picture.

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