Diplomacy by Chavez

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

chavez_250

hide captionHe's certainly energetic.

Source: Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty

It's safe to say that if Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez were a perfume ("Diplomacy: by Chavez") he would smell... strong. (Maybe woodsy too). In his latest diplomatic scuffle, Chavez's attempt at hostage mediation between the government of Colombia and FARC rebels has ended in nothing but insults, and "frozen" relations between Colombia and Venezuela. Today, the Ambassador of Venezuela will be here to explain what the spat is about, but you can do a little advanced reading on your own here.

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Pompous, arrogant, popular (with people that have NOTHING to loose), vocal, Anti-Western. Yea, he's got a lot going for him. Too bad brains, aren't in his list of resources. After he turns Venezuela into another Cuba (what a lovely, well-fed, utopia THAT is). Will he spend the rest of his days looking over his shoulder like his "friend" Fidel? The saddest part of all this, What are the people of Venezuela going to do, when they finally realise Chavez is just a con-artist (out for himself, not them).

Sent by Harold | 2:56 PM | 11-29-2007

It seems that every time that America gets involved in a war that is unpopular around the world we see ignorant, bellicose and rabble rousing dictators spring up like nasty little mushrooms. They are an example of the worlds anxiety over our behavior as much as Mr Bush and his cabal are an expression of some Americans anxiety over the rest of the world.

Hugo and all of his fellow travelers in fear and greed will use the big bad yankee as a way to maintain their power and privledges until the big bad yankee quits acting so big and bad. Then they will fall victim to their own hubris and ignorance.

Sent by George from Oregon | 3:40 PM | 11-29-2007

Lynn Neary on Chavez and Musharraf

Is it your producer or is it you?

You get Musharraf???s tenure in office wrong (this is third term and illegitimate term following a coup--number 2--in which he sacked Pakistan???s Supreme Court to get judges to rule as he wanted them to; this is his second coup and an unconstitutional third term.

Note UPI's lead: ??? ISLAMABAD, Pakistan, Nov. 26 (UPI) -- Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf reportedly will resign Thursday as chief of the army and take an oath of office for a third term as president. ???

Then you appear to have commanded the appearance of the Venezuelan ambassador and proceed to insult him.

You attack with rapid fire (producer produced?) questions and when you finish firing questions you cut him off, as you did the Calif. woman on homelessness, when he doesn???t respond as you expect. And of course you conveniently run out of time.

All day (morning edition and talk of the nation so far) NPR has been carrying the Bush- anti Chavez mantra while ignoring whether Chavez???s claims, as Russia is also claiming, of U.S. interference in his country has any basis.

Instead of pummeling the ambassador, why not put calls in to Chavez and Bush and have both of them on air, along with Musharraf, discussing imperial presidency and interference in other nations??? affairs?

Barring this why not have a discussion with the ambassador and others discussing heads of states' relationships in the Americas: Colombia, Venezuela, USA, et.al., throw in Central America too.

What you did was horrible.

Your interview with the ambassador (as Network on-air Americans tend to be) was high handed, ill informed and ill informing.

NPR (and you as one of the veterans at NPR) should try practicing journalism in the public interest.

Sent by CL Bennett | 4:00 PM | 11-29-2007

It is outrageous to hear the venezuelan ambassador when he lies to you and your listener. He said the electoral council in Venezuela is unbyass or neutral, but the truth is that the electoral council as well as the supreme court and the general asembly obey 100% Chavez' orders. Unfortunely I only heard the last 10 minutes of your interview with him but you should have invited some one from the other side of the coin.
Walter Grauer.

Sent by walter grauer | 4:07 PM | 11-29-2007

Yes the venezuelan asembly is 100% Chavista because the people of Venezuela elected them. The same way Chavez was democratically elected 6 times.

Sent by Jose Samuel Hurtado | 4:29 PM | 11-29-2007


Lynn Neary on Chavez and Musharraf
Is it your producer or is it you?
You get Musharraf's tenure in office wrong (this is third term and illegitimate term following a coup--number 2--in which he sacked Pakistan's Supreme Court to get judges to rule as he wanted them to; this is his second coup and an unconstitutional third term.
....
Then you appear to have commanded the appearance of the Venezuelan ambassador and proceed to insult him.
....
NPR (and you as one of the veterans at NPR) should try practicing journalism in the public interest.
Sent by CL Bennett | 4:00 PM ET | 11-29-2007

CL:
As we stated on the show today, President Musharraf was just elected to a second five year term as president. That is accurate.

Regarding the interview with the Venezuelan ambassador, we'll let the interview speak for itself. You can hear it by clicking on the link above.

Sent by Scott Cameron, TOTN | 9:13 PM | 11-29-2007

It is interesting...Chavez just lost on the polls, and he accepted the results...mmmm...that sounds democratic.
Also, I take issue with the wording of the many reports that say Chavez was looking to become President for life, and the like. As far as I know, in democratic countries such as England, Spain and Germany their leaders can be re-elected for their position for life.
I guess it would be more useful to try to understand why Chavez acts the way he does, rather than demonize him.

Sent by Eric Gamboa | 8:46 AM | 12-3-2007

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