Coming Up

November 13th Show

In today's first hour, we will talk about the shifting workforce where many Americans are working as independent "home-based" contractors and freelancers, and enjoying flexible schedules sans that dreaded daily commute. But many who chose this professional lifestyle must fend for themselves when it comes to health benefits and retirement plans. Author Matt Bai covers national politics for The New York Times Magazine, and recently wrote that most Americans who work exclusively from home represent a "modern, untethered American work force." He will be one of our guests who will talk about workers "unplugged" and whether or not companies and the government will ever provide benefits to their contractors. Following that, NPR's health and science correspondent Jonathan Hamilton will answer your questions about A.D.H.D. (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) and explain the details of a new study from the National Institute of Mental Health and McGill University that shows children with A.D.H.D.suffer from a delay in brain development. And we will read your blog and email comments at the end of the hour.

Our second hour will be part one of a two-part series on adoption. Currently, only eight states allow adult adoptees access to their original birth records. However, the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute says EVERY state should open its records to adopted adults so that they can learn the identity of their birth parents and their biological and medical history. Critics argue that open birth records breach the right to privacy the birth mother was guaranteed when she decided to give her child up for adoption. We'll examine both sides of the issues today, and hear more stories about adoption in our second part which we expect to have for you next week. At the end of the hour, director Mike Newell will talk about his film, "Love in the Time of Cholera," a movie based on the novel of the same name by Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

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