Coming Up

November 19th Show

In yesterday's New York Times, correspondent David Sanger reported that the Bush administration provided Pakistan with almost one hundred million dollars in aid over six years to help secure the country's nuclear weapons. The program is highly classified and U.S. aid is likely to continue. How worried should we be? David Sanger is the New York Times' chief Washington correspondent and will tell us what we know, what we should know, and how secure the nuclear weapons are in Pakistan. He will be joined by Zia Mian, a physicist and director of the Project on Peace and Security in South Asia at Princeton University. And as I type this, we are working on our weekly opinion page segment that comes at the end of the first hour.

Former NBC Nightly News anchor Tom Brokaw will join us in our second hour. He is the author of a new book entitled Boom! Voices of the Sixties: Personal Reflections on the '60s and Today. His book has been published near the fortieth anniversary of the year 1968, a particularly significant year in a decade where feminism, anti-war and civil rights movements (to only name a few) defined who we were and what we stood for. According to Brokaw, "It was a profoundly eventful time, and the lasting effects are as vigorously debated as the era that produced them." We'll talk to Tom Brokaw about the 1960s — a decade that redefined America. Following that, we'll go from events of the 1960s to events of the 6th century. Beowulf has been on a lot of people's minds lately. It's the number one box office movie in America right now. But does anyone actually remember the original classic poem? Okay maybe not, since it was written in Old English prose. But acclaimed Nobel Laureate Seamus Heaney published a best-selling translation of the epic poem seven years ago. Heaney will join us today to talk about the story and meaning of Beowulf... and hopefully read a little bit for us!!!

Enjoy today's show!

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