Coming Up

November 28th Show

In this week's mega-Political Junkie, Ken Rudin talks about Governor Mike Huckabee's surge in Iowa and what that means for the Republican contenders, the spotlight on tonight's CNN/youtube debate in the Sunshine State, and celebrity endorsement power in politics. Following our junkie segment, we will talk to journalist Joshua Hammer about three American hostages who, for four years, have been held captive in South America by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia. Diplomatic efforts to gain their release have stalled. Hammer documents this story in report entitled "Bungle in the Jungle." You can find it in the December issue of Men's Vogue. And because we didn't get a chance to read from your emails and blog comments as we planned to yesterday, we promise to do so today at the end of the first hour...AND offer up a direction correction. Last week, a guest on our program claimed that the Nile "... is one of the only rivers, or the only river that runs south to north in the world...." Well, it turns out the Nile is not the only one. In our "letters" segment, we'll talk to Allen Carroll, Chief Cartographer for National Geographic, about why people tend to think that rivers runs south.

Whether you've ever read it from cover-to-cover or only heard about its societal impact, Karl Marx's Das Kapital is considered one of the most important and influential books ever written and a ground-breaking critique of capitalism. Author Francis Wheen will join us in our second hour to talk about his new book, Marx's Das Kapital : A Biography, the latest in a series from the Atlantic Monthly Press called "Books that Changed the World." And since Wheen is also the author of the biography Karl Marx : A Life, he will also discuss Karl Marx's life and influence on the economic social structures of his time. As I type, we are working on a segment to follow that interview. Stay tuned!!!

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.