Three Guantanamo Detainees May Face the Death Penalty

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Now that the Pentagon has announced charges against six of the detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, few people are sure about what to expect next. Military prosecutors are recommending the death penalty for crimes associated with 9/11 in what will be the first real test of the new military tribunal system. Debate over the tribunals has already gone before the Supreme Court. And, last week's admission by the head of the CIA that Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, one of those charged, was waterboarded during interrogations, raises questions about the evidence Mohammed provided, and what can legitimately be used against him during trial. This is one of those moments where you just need an expert lawyer to help answer all the questions, so we'll talk with BETH HILLMAN, a law professor at Rutgers and a member of the board of directors of the National Institute for Military Justice.

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I don't want him put to death. That's what he expects...to be a martyr to the cause so other terrorists can follow him. I want him locked away forever, forced to listen to and watch the birthday tapes and weddings and celebrations of all sorts...of those he killed...for the rest of his life...without the ability to cut it off.

Sent by Ken Staley | 3:45 PM | 2-11-2008

Why did they wait so long to bring them to trial. Who's decision is the time table. How did Saddam receive the right to a speedy trial and decapitation? Who is investigating the use of waterboarding on only three people?

Sent by Keith | 3:50 PM | 2-11-2008

I feel like a terrorist when my country does this. You can't convince me that water boarding is for the greater good and no matter what role this man played in 9/11, it gives no justice to our actions.

Sent by Joe | 11:01 AM | 2-12-2008