Coming Up

November 13th Show

For almost 20 minutes yesterday, we talked about the flu (and how Google keeps track of it). It seems just talking about the flu on a national program is enough for some people to actually catch it... particularly if you are the host. I'm hoping that Neal Conan doesn't actually have the flu, but whatever it is, it's kept him home today. The good news is Andrea Seabrook will be sitting in the host's chair, sniffle-free!! (Feel better soon, Neal.) Here's what's happening on the show today:

It's been a week since it was announced that Barack Obama will be the next president of the United States, and while some are still celebrating, a burning question seems to have risen to the surface: What does Obama's win mean for race relations in America? In our first hour today, two African-American journalists share their thoughts about how Obama's win could change long held beliefs about race in America and what expectations people now have about each other across color lines. After that, Governor Howard Dean will explain why he will not be seeking another term as chairman of the Democratic National Committee.

Home values contine to decline in this country, and many people have been forced to sell their homes for less than the purchasing price. And even if you're not looking to sell (or buy), the dropping value can affect your wallet. In our second hour, Dean Foust, Atlanta bureau chief for BusinessWeek magazine and Robert Shiller, professor of economics and finance at Yale, will map out the value of homes across the country, and give us a sense of how long home prices might continue to fall. And we want to hear from you. What's happening to the value of your home and how are you dealing with it? At the end of the hour, Moore. Roger Moore. Now is your chance to find out what it's really like making those James Bond movies. Moore has a new memoir out now entitled, My Word is My Bond. Catchy.

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