Poor Persecuted Hummer Drivers?

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Red AND a Hummer. More tickets, or fewer? jwinfred hide caption

itoggle caption jwinfred

There are a bunch of myths and superstitions about who gets tickets, and when they get 'em. Like, drivers of red cars get stopped more often. Then, there's one I heard — you can't get a speeding ticket in the rain because the radar guns don't work.* Or, incredibly, that tin foil in your hubcaps can fool police radar. But here's a generalization that feels like a fact: Hummer drivers get more tickets. According to Ben Mack at Wired.com, "people who drive Hummers receive almost five times as many traffic tickets as the average driver." From his article on the Quality Planning Corp. study:

The study found those who drive the leviathans get 4.63 times as many tickets as the average driver, something the researchers attribute to the feeling of invincibility that comes from driving a rolling bank vault.

"The sense of power that Hummer drivers derive from their vehicle may be directly correlated with the number of violations they incur, or perhaps Hummer drivers, by virtue of their driving position, are less likely to notice road hazards, signs, pedestrians and other drivers," Raj Bhat, president of Quality Planning, said in a statement.

So what do you think? Are the drivers just disregarding the rules of the road and being justly penalized? If you think so, what do you make of this, further down in the article:

What's weird is the Hummer is essentially a Chevrolet Tahoe under the skin, but Tahoe drivers were less likely than average to be ticketed for moving violations.

I know I've cursed the drivers of those behemoth's on multiple occasions, accusing them of all kinds of crimes against drivers, pedestrians, and humanity in general. But is the ticketing disparity about the drivers or the police? I doubt we'll ever know, but it sure made me think...

*It seems rain can, at least, mess up the reading.

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