Spectacular Specs, Mr. Daschle

Tom Daschle

Tom Daschle, colorblind or fashion-forward? Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Let me start with this: I generally enjoy reading Maureen Dowd's column in The New York Times. Nine times out of ten when I notice she's got a new one, I'll click on it, read it through, and walk into work thinking about it. She's smart and provocative. That said, there's one little bit she wrote today that I cannot stop thinking about, and I don't think it's the point of a piece largely about President Obama's missteps in his first two weeks. Obama, on his appointment of former Sen. Tom Daschle:

He told the anchors that the man who helped make him president, Tom Daschle, had made "a serious mistake" by not paying taxes on a car and driver. (It should have been a harbinger of doom when Daschle began sporting those determined-to-be-hip round red glasses.)

The important part of that clip? Daschle, the taxes, and the mea culpa. But the part I fixated on is the "determined-to-be-hip round red glasses." It just made me feel sorry for Daschle. I thought the glasses were kind of attractively un-Washington, but when Dowd called him out for them, it took me straight back to my childhood.

When my sister and I were growing up, everyone scrunched his or her socks down around his or her ankles — no one wore "tall socks," athletic socks pulled up, or knee highs. We were determined to make our Dad "cool," so we constantly pushed his tall socks down, and he bore our sartorial directives with a smile. But if a 1980s Maureen Dowd type had seen him at the mall with his socks pushed down, she probably would have thought the same thing she thought about Daschle.

So what's the point? Dowd, keep doing what you do. I usually enjoy it, and you're not trying to impress me anyway. And Daschle? There's one person out here who likes those specs.

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