March 16th Show

Today, the Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism released its annual report on the state of American journalism, and to borrow a word from the report, the state of American journalism is "bleak". David McCumber is the managing editor of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, a newspaper that was put up for sale last January. In our first hour today, McCumber, along with Tom Rosenstiel, director of the Project for Excellence in Journalism, will discuss the state of the media in the current global economic crisis and the future of journalism for local television, radio, newspapers and the web. Then on our opinion page this week, writer Kelly Marages will talk about her op-ed that appeared in Sunday's Washington Post where she argues that for some people living through the current economic recession, frugal living is the new "chic." She doesn't buy it.

The recession in this country has clearly affected Americans in all layers of the economy, and many have found themselves collecting unemployment benefits and reaching out for help for the first time in their lives. In our second hour, we'll hear about the mixed feelings that have come up for people who are seeking governmental and charitable assistance, and the stigma that is attached to asking for help. And we want to hear your story. If you've been collecting food stamps or unemployment benefits, how do you feel about it? At the end of the hour, we will search for the perfect Irish pub. When American writer Bill Barich took up residence in Dublin, the first thing he set out to do was to find the local pub in his new neighborhood that he hoped would fit his image of the perfect pub. Barich will talk to us about what he discovered and his new book, A Pint of Plain: How the Irish Pub Losts Its Magic but Conquered the World. And we want you to describe the perfect pub. What elements must be in place for a pub to be great?

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.