The Cure For TiVo Hoarding

TiVo overload tends to strike this time of year. Season finales chew up a chunk of gigabytes on the hard disk, alongside all the old episodes of M*A*S*H we refuse to delete. Christopher Borrelli confesses to TiVo hoarding in today's Chicago Tribune and says he's finally come to a decision: Delete! He's saved so many programs over the years that he figures he's partly to blame for the decline of the single mass event that we all share in.

I've contributed to the decline for decades. See, for ages now, I've withheld certain books, movies, records and TV finales from myself. I prefer it this way. It's my perpetual present under the tree.

For example, while those around me work out the political underpinnings of "Battlestar Galactica," I have nothing to add. I stopped watching after the first season. It's not that I hate "Battlestar Galactica" — I love it, so much that by the end of season one, I didn't want it to end. So I sat out three seasons. The finale is now months old; for me, it will be years away. One day, when I can no longer hold out, I will be rewarded.

I am a cultural Jonas brother.

If you've ever sat frozen, remote in hand, debating whether to make room for LOST by deleting that old episode of Buffy, you'll appreciate the rest of his op-ed.

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