Fire David Letterman

David Letterman apologized (again) to Gov. Sarah Palin. But that didn't stop a website called FireDavidLetterman.com from organizing a protest outside of the Ed Sullivan Theater in New York yesterday. More reporters showed up to cover the event than actual protesters. There's now a Facebook group dedicated to ousting Dave and many, many opinions going back and forth.

From Ken Tucker at EW.com to David Letterman:

Clam up.
Don't give Gov. Palin any more material to react to. From her Today Show interview alone, it was obvious that no matter how much Matt Lauer tried to raise serious questions about various overreactions to your jokes, she's glowingly happy to be in the national spotlight again and doesn't want to give it up any time soon.

Where the first few days of this controversy probably helped you in the ratings, I can't believe that you, a tough but fair competitor, want to win against the Tonight Show on the back of this kind of controversy.

Amy Siskind at Huffingtonpost.com sees in this debate the next wave of feminism:

Gone is the "women's movement." This wave is not focused solely on women. This wave is primarily about the next generation — our daughters and granddaughters. We see the sexualization of the next generation. We see the disturbing parade of misogyny and sexism. Mothers and fathers, grandmothers and grandfathers are sick and tired of the constant assault against women and girls.

....

And perhaps most revolutionary of all are the unlikely alliances being forged to fight against the words of David Letterman. Women who have had abortions are joining hands with those whose religion forbids it. Men who voted against Proposition 8 are joining hands with lesbian couples. Women who pulled the lever for a Republican are joining hands with men who voted for a Democrat. All uniting in the name of common decency and the desire to make things better for the next generation. It's a "how did we let it come to this" type of moment.

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