October 1st Show

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David Dickerson's concept of a wedding card for an ex-fiancee. We'll talk with him in today's second hour about other greeting card emergencies. Image courtesy of David Dickerson hide caption

itoggle caption Image courtesy of David Dickerson

How Dangerous Is Football?
A new study suggests that all the hits NFL players take may be linked to a much higher risk of cognitive impairment. While the study focused only on dementia-related illness, many are aware of the various bodily injuries football players suffer in the game. So how safe is football, and how worried should high school and college players be?

Juliette Lewis On Her New Movie 'Whip It'
Juliette Lewis' early roles in Cape Fear and What's Eating Gilbert Grape firmly established her as one of Hollywood's most talented and versatile actors. In her latest role, Lewis plays roller derby squad leader "Iron Maven" in the new movie Whip It. Lewis talks about her career as an enigmatic actress, and her debut as a solo singer.

What's Your Greeting Card Emergency?
David Dickerson spent seven years writing birthday rhymes and sympathy wishes at Hallmark, an experience Dickerson says opened up a world that calls for sentiments for the unexpected and somewhat bizarre. Ex-fiance getting married? He's got a card for that. Snake ate your school's hamster? He's got a card for that, too. Dickerson talks about his new book, House of Cards: Love, Faith, and Other Social Expressions.

Reviving Detroit
Detroit: The Death — and Possible Life — of a Great City. That's the title of an article that appears in Time magazine written by Motor City native Daniel Okrent. He joins us to talk about why he believes "the ultimate fate of Detroit will reveal much about the character of America in the 21st century", and offers a way to revive his hometown. Current and former Detroiters, how do you bring the city back?

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