October 5th Show

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hide captionThe Supreme Court reconvenes today, with upcoming cases on gun rights, free speech, campaign money and sex offenders, among others. We'll get a preview in today's second hour.

JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images
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The Supreme Court reconvenes today, with upcoming cases on gun rights, free speech, campaign money and sex offenders, among others. We'll get a preview in today's second hour.

JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

To The Political Extreme
On the right, a column predicts a possible military coup to "resolve the Obama problem." On the left, a congressman accuses Republicans of wanting people to die quickly. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik describes the current climate of extreme discourse, and listeners tell us how extremist talk is changing their conversation.

'What America Needs Is A Good Enemy'
Columnist Gregory Rodriguez talks about his opinion piece that appears in today's Los Angeles Times entitled, What America needs is a good enemy. In it, Rodriguez argues that amid the "increasingly vitriolic and even seditious rhetoric coming from the political right," what we need is an external threat to help bring the country together.

Sex Offenders, Guns And Money
The Supreme Court opens its new term today with cases involving sex offenders, gun rights, free speech and campaign finance, among other issues. Meanwhile, all eyes are on the newest justice, Sonia Sotomayor. Supreme Court experts David Savage and Dahlia Lithwick focus on four cases and the key decisions the court faces in a new term.

An Underground Railroad To Save Gay Iraqis
Reports of gay death squads and torture practices against gay men in Iraq have been on the rise. In an article written for this week's New York Magazine , Matthew McAllester describes the wave of attacks against gays in Iraq, and how a few New Yorkers have built an underground railroad to rescue them.

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