Girls Being Girls

Watch the above video and you will no longer think soccer is boring (apologies if you're an evangelist — I can't get into it). You also may be surprised by the level of aggression shown by the women — though, if you've seen this head butt, you know things get rough with the men. But the behavior of New Mexico's Elizabeth Lambert in that game — pulling her opponent's ponytail in particular —has caused a bit of a stir, and raises a lot of interesting questions. Do women feel pressure to behave like men on the field? And if they do, is there anything wrong with that? I'll admit that it makes me feel a little psyched to see a woman kick butt, even though she's clearly out of line. It's always bugged me how women's lacrosse is so sanitized in comparison to the men's game. That's not to say that I think there should be more violence in sports, but the double standard bothers me. Mary Jo Kane, the director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport at the University of Minnesota, put it this way in the New York Times,

"I think women being physically aggressive and violent is, in many ways, the last boundary to break," Kane said. "I think you'll see snippets, but I don't think you'll see the same kind of behavior as men. In the broader social context, we don't allow women to engage in that kind of behavior. There would be a pushback."

What do you think? Egregious, or evolutionary?

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