November 19th Show

Courtroom sketch of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed. i i

In this photo of a sketch by courtroom artist Janet Hamlin, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed sits during a hearing at the U.S. Military Commissions court for war crimes, at the U.S. Naval Base, in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Monday, Jan. 19, 2009. Janet Hamlin, Pool/AP Photo hide caption

itoggle caption Janet Hamlin, Pool/AP Photo
Courtroom sketch of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed.

In this photo of a sketch by courtroom artist Janet Hamlin, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed sits during a hearing at the U.S. Military Commissions court for war crimes, at the U.S. Naval Base, in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Monday, Jan. 19, 2009.

Janet Hamlin, Pool/AP Photo

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed's Manhattan Trial
Earlier this week, Attorney General Eric Holder announced that Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the self-proclaimed mastermind behind the 9-11 terrorist attacks, will be tried in a civilian court in New York City. Some argue it will open old wounds, while others say it will offer closure.

Tom Ricks: Read These Books, Understand Afghanistan
The conflict in Afghanistan dominates headlines, but many are looking for a deeper understanding of the country and the war we're fighting there. In the first of a series of suggestions for an Afghanistan "reading list," Tom Ricks joins us. His recommendations range from a collection of Afghan proverbs to a history of the CIA's involvement in the country.

Ken Auletta, 'Googled'
In Googled: The End of the World as We Know It, Ken Auletta, who writes the "Annals of Communication" column for The New Yorker, chronicles the growth of Google, from the brainchild of two computer science graduate students, toiling in a California garage, to the multi-billion dollar multi-national corporation it is today.

Indentured Servitude Still A Reality In Florida
Slavery was abolished in the United States in 1865, but the specter of slavery persists in Florida's fields — among tomato and citrus pickers. Reporter Amy Bennett Williams joins Neal Conan in Fort Myers, Fla., to discuss the horrors of indentured servitude, human trafficking, and how prosecutors are fighting it.

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