November 24th Show

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A cross marks the place of a car crash in Colby, Kansas. In today's second hour we'll talk about what you're willing to give up for safer roads. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Spencer Platt/Getty Images
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A cross marks the place of a car crash in Colby, Kansas. In today's second hour we'll talk about what you're willing to give up for safer roads.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Jihadists in America
Federal investigators filed charges against eight people in connection with the disappearance of young Somali-Americans who allegedly left the U.S. to fight with a terrorist group in Somalia. Authorities say this is part of the biggest domestic terrorism investigation since the 9-11 attacks. NPR's counterterrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston talks with Neal Conan about the investigation, and what has investigators so worried.

Journalism Shield Laws?
From Watergate to Abu Ghraib, anonymous sources have been a critical tool for journalists reporting on corruption and misconduct. A federal law protecting reporters from revealing their sources is now making its way through the Senate Judiciary committee. Toni Locy, a former USA Today reporter once held in contempt for not revealing her sources in connection with her reporting on the 2001 anthrax attacks, talks about the proposed "shield law" and whether or not reporters should get it.

The Road to Safety
Last year, 37,000 people died in cars. Neal Conan will be joined by NPR senior editor Marilyn Geewax, who oversees "On The Road To Safety", NPR's series about highway safety. And listeners reveal what they'd be willing to give up to prevent traffic deaths. Pay more taxes for better highways? Ban cell phone use? Take the keys away? What would you give up to make our roads safer?

Avoid "Queue Rage" This Holiday
This holiday season, what's one thing that's worse than rummaging through a pile of picked over sweaters for just the right size? Waiting in line to actually buy it. MIT professor Dick Larson (a.k.a. Dr. Queue) says that while we may not be able to cut down the wait time, we can cut our frustration. Dr. Queue talks about the psychology of waiting in line and gives some suggestions on how to avoid "queue rage" this holiday season. Tip #1: Lines are shortest just before closing.

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