December 22nd Show

NPR's ombudsman fields a daily barrage of listener complaints and comments. In our second hour, Ombu

hide captionNPR's ombudsman fields a daily barrage of listener complaints and comments. In our second hour, Ombudsman Alicia Shepard responds to listener's concerns, including NPR reporters on Fox News, an overabundance of Tiger, and Neal's "congratulations" to an anti-gay marriage activist.

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Few Options Left For U.S. On Iran
The clock is ticking on the Obama administration's efforts to negotiate with Iran over its disputed nuclear program, according to the U.S.'s top military officer. Iran faces the possibility of even more sanctions as an end of the year U.N. deadline looms for making progress on nuclear negotiations. And yesterday, tens of thousands of Iranians turned out in the street to mourn the death of a dissident cleric while chanting anti-government slogans. NPR foreign correspondent Mike Shuster tells us the latest on what's happening in Iran as President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad deals with turmoil inside and outside his country and President Obama weighs his few remaining options.

You Owe: $12,097,983,161,366.65
It has been a year that put everyone into debt, including the U.S. Government. Our total public deficit is now greater than twelve trillion dollars. Economist Dean Baker explains how U.S. government debt gets paid back and how public debt differs from private debt.

New Skills To Find New Work
More than 15-million people are out of work in the U.S. And many of their jobs — in manufacturing, textiles and the auto industries — are gone forever. So to find employment, workers now face the grueling task of reinventing and reeducating themselves, or risk getting left behind. The challenge is particularly intense for older workers, who never imagined they'd be starting over so late in their careers. Guests look at how people are dealing with long-term unemployment and retraining themselves in a new labor market.

What Troubles You About NPR?
From NPR's coverage of the Tiger Woods scandal, to what to call the president, NPR's ombudsman fields a daily barrage of listener complaints and comments. Ombudsman Alicia Shepard responds to listeners' concerns, including NPR reporters on Fox News, and Neal's "congratulations" to an anti-gay marriage activist.

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