December 23rd Show

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hide captionMajor General Tony Cucolo, commander of the 3rd Infantry Division and Task Force Marne, prepares for a mock television interview during a Mission Readiness Exercise at Fort Stewart, Ga. in preparation for their future deployment to Iraq.

U.S. Army, Col. Steven Boylan/AP Photo
LEAD IMAGE

Major General Tony Cucolo, commander of the 3rd Infantry Division and Task Force Marne, prepares for a mock television interview during a Mission Readiness Exercise at Fort Stewart, Ga. in preparation for their future deployment to Iraq.

U.S. Army, Col. Steven Boylan/AP Photo

Political Junkie Year-in-Review
NPR's political junkie Ken Rudin looks at the political news of 2009, from the inauguration of President Obama to the health care overhaul, from "You lie!" to "hiking on the Appalachian trail." And we'll ask you for your favorite political moments from the past year.

Another Look At America's Public Debt
Yesterday, we spoke with economist Dean Baker about the United States' public debt and why it isn't going to break us. Today, economic columnist Robert Samuelson explains why he feels differently, and believes America could go broke.

Private Lives In Uniform
A U.S. commander in northern Iraq has backed away from a threat to court-martial soldiers who get pregnant, or cause a pregnancy. But the issue presents a larger picture of military life, and the rules of fraternization in the armed forces. NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman examines what's private about private life when you're in uniform.

What Happened In Copenhagen?
President Barack Obama hailed last week's last-minute accord at the U.N. climate summit in Copenhagen as a breakthrough, but many delegates from the 193 participating countries left disappointed. NPR Science Correspondent Richard Harris talks about what was, and what was not, achieved in Copenhagen, and what lies ahead for the global fight against climate change.

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