December 2nd Show

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Nearly half the commercial flights in the United States are now on small regional carriers. In today's second hour, we'll talk about the safety issues that raises, and the surprising pay and training differences between the regional carriers and the major airlines. Jim Frazier hide caption

itoggle caption Jim Frazier
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Nearly half the commercial flights in the United States are now on small regional carriers. In today's second hour, we'll talk about the safety issues that raises, and the surprising pay and training differences between the regional carriers and the major airlines.

Jim Frazier

Political Junkie: Afghanistan And More
This week, political junkie Ken Rudin talks about President Obama's announcement last night of his plans for the war in Afghanistan. Ken will talk about the speech and reactions from both parties — plus Governor Mark Sanford's possible impeachment proceedings in South Carolina, Atlanta's mayoral runoff, and the trouble brewing in South Carolina for Senator Lindsey Graham. That, and so much more, including this week's trivia question.

A Life Of Louis Armstrong
Louis Armstrong revolutionized jazz and became an instantly recognizable icon. Behind his charismatic million-watt smile, Armstrong understood his place in history, and left behind hundreds of recorded conversations about his life. Terry Teachout talks about his new biography of the jazz legend,Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong, and the some 650 tapes of Armstrong that served as the basis for the book.

Who's Really Flying Your Plane?
Think a top-paid, highly-trained major airline pilot always flies your plane? Well, think again. Your next flight may not be on the airline you expect, and the pilots may not be nearly as well trained. Barbara Peterson, the aviation correspondent for Conde Nast Traveler, explains how regional airlines are handling nearly half of the commercial flights in the United States.

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