January 12th Show

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A man holds his briefcase while in line at a job fair that attracted hundreds of people on November 6, 2009 in New York City. Spencer Platt / Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Spencer Platt / Getty Images
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A man holds his briefcase while in line at a job fair that attracted hundreds of people on November 6, 2009 in New York City.

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Taking The Economy's Temperature
Two years after the recession began, the economy is still fragile. The unemployment rate is still at 10 percent and many economists expect it to stay that way through 2010. Today, guest host Rebecca Roberts will check in with some regular guests of TOTN to see how they're faring at the start of a new year. Tell us your stories of how you are adapting in tough times. What are the economic indicators in YOUR life that tell you things are getting better... or worse?

'Facing Ali'
From "The Rumble in the Jungle" to the "Thrilla in Manila," Muhammad Ali's quick hands, fast talking, and impact on the world of boxing have been heard and seen around the world. But what do the athletes who went toe-to-toe in the ring with Ali have to say about "The Greatest"? Filmmaker Pete McCormack's latest documentary, Facing Ali, examines the career of the heavyweight championship boxer, as well as the trials and tribulations of 10 of his most formidable opponents.

The Globalization Of The American Psyche
We export McDonalds, Nike and Coca-Cola. But author Ethan Watters identifies another powerful U.S. export: how we define and treat mental illness such as depression, anorexia and schizophrenia. Watters talks about his book, Crazy Like Us: The Globalization of the American Psyche, and how the American view of mental illness has spread abroad.

McGwire's Tearful Admission
Mark McGwire confirmed yesterday what many people suspected: he took steroids when he broke Major League Baseball's home run record. NPR's Tom Goldman covered the great home run race, McGwire's infamous 2005 testimony to Congress, and yesterday's confession. He talks about the subdued reaction to the news, why McGwire is talking now, and what it means for McGwire's career and legacy.

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