January 26th Show

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Doug Currington landed in the Lubbock County Jail for trying to steal a television. All that stands between him and the door: $150 bail. In our second hour, we'll talk about the business of bail bonds and why thousands of inmates are in America's jails because they can't make bail. Laura Sullivan/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Laura Sullivan/NPR
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Doug Currington landed in the Lubbock County Jail for trying to steal a television. All that stands between him and the door: $150 bail. In our second hour, we'll talk about the business of bail bonds and why thousands of inmates are in America's jails because they can't make bail.

Laura Sullivan/NPR

A Way Forward in Reconstructing Haiti
International donors yesterday agreed to a decade-long commitment to rebuild Haiti, but the scale of devastation in Port-au-Prince will test the capacity of an already weak government and an impoverished population. Economist Jeffrey Sachs and other experts look at how to begin rebuilding Haiti.

The Republic of Yemen
The Republic of Yemen has been in the news more than usual, and there is growing concern over al Qaeda's ability to operate in the country. Sudarsan Raghavan, a foreign correspondent for The Washington Post, talks about what she learned from a recent two month reporting trip to Yemen.

Making Bail
Thousands of inmates sitting in America's jails are there because they can't make bail—sometimes as little as $50. And some will wait behind bars for as long as a year before their cases make it to court. The cost to taxpayers? Nine billion dollars this year just to house them. NPR's crime and punishment correspondent Laura Sullivan looks inside the business of bail bonds.

The Trial of Scott Roeder
The trial of Scott Roeder, the anti-abortion activist accused of murdering abortion doctor George Tiller, begins this week. GQ reporter Devin Friedman conducted extensive interviews with Roeder about the day of the murder, and explains why Roeder was convinced that killing Tiller was a righteous act.

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