February 11th Show

Bernice Johnson Reagon. i i

hide captionSinger Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon speaks during a music workshop for high school students in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, DC, February 9, 2010.

SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
Bernice Johnson Reagon.

Singer Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon speaks during a music workshop for high school students in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, DC, February 9, 2010.

SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

Songs From The Civil Rights Movement
This week, the White House continued a series of evenings celebrating the music that tells the story of America. "In Performance at the White House: A Celebration of Music from the Civil Rights Movement" — a concert celebrating Black History Month — captured the hardships and hopes of those fighting for equal rights in America during the 1960s. The event brought together many luminaries, from legendary Motown singer Smokey Robinson, to one of the original Freedom Singers, Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon. Neal Conan talks with Dr. Reagon and her daughter, Toshi Reagon, about the influence of music during the Civil Rights Movement — and how the sprit of song continues today.

'Newsonomics'
The Internet has finally surpassed newspapers as readers' number-one choice for news, yet newspapers still haven't figured out a way to make money online. TV viewing is plummeting as well, with most teens choosing to spend their time online. We'll speak to Ken Doctor about Newsonomics: Twelve New Trends that Will Shape the News You Get.

The Blackwater Case
The Iraqi government was incensed when a federal judge threw out charges against five security contractors accused of killing civilians in a 2007 Baghdad square. The shooting by the Blackwater security guards inflamed anti-American sentiment in Iraq, and fallout from the incident even prompted the company to change its name. Washington Post reporter Del Quentin Wilber explains how prosecutors' missteps undermined what once appeared a solid case.

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