February 17th Show

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In an image from the February issue of National Geographic, female FLDS members wear modest attire -- ankle-length prairie dresses -- even while swimming. In our first hour, photojournalist Stephanie Sinclair talks about documenting polygamy in America. Stephanie Sinclair/National Geographic hide caption

itoggle caption Stephanie Sinclair/National Geographic
LEAD IMAGE

In an image from the February issue of National Geographic, female FLDS members wear modest attire -- ankle-length prairie dresses -- even while swimming. In our first hour, photojournalist Stephanie Sinclair talks about documenting polygamy in America.

Stephanie Sinclair/National Geographic

The Political Junkie Talks Recent Retirements
When Democratic Senator Evan Bayh announced he won't run for re-election, he joined an ever-growing list of Congressmen and women who've decided to leave Washington, DC. Political Junkie Ken Rudin deciphers what all these exits say about political disenchantment with Washington, and the effect they might have on the 2010 midterm elections.

Polygamy In America
Photojournalist Stephanie Sinclair was given rare, and intimate access to the men and women of the polygamist Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She talks about her experience. Sinclair's photos, taken during several periods since April of 2008, appear in this month's National Geographic.

New Images Of 9/11
Almost nine years after the September 11th terrorist attacks, striking aerial photos of the Twin Towers burning, and then collapsing, were released to the public for the first time last week. The New York Police Department detective who took those photos talks about what it was like taking those pictures while on a rescue mission that day.

Faces Of America
Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates has been tracing DNA clues to uncover lost family histories for almost four years. This month his most expansive study to date, Faces of America, airs as a four part series on PBS. Gates and one of his guests, professor of African American Studies and poet Elizabeth Alexander, talk about what the study says about individual identities and the make-up of America.

From Riches to Rags
Alexandra Penney had it all — a successful career, a vibrant life, and a substantial nest egg. Then one day she got a phone call that all her savings were gone, lost in the Bernard Madoff scandal. Penney talks about her life since then, and about her new memoir, The Bag Lady Papers: The Priceless Experience of Losing It All.

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