February 22nd Show

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hide captionA New York University graduate student celebrates after receiving her degree in New York last May. In our first hour, two reporters talk about the long-term effects the current recession will have on the character of a generation.

EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images
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A New York University graduate student celebrates after receiving her degree in New York last May. In our first hour, two reporters talk about the long-term effects the current recession will have on the character of a generation.

EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images

A Jobless Generation
The U.S. economy is showing early signs of a recovery, but the recession's wide-ranging effects may haunt us for years, particularly unemployment and underemployment. Don Peck of The Atlantic predicts that this new era of joblessness will cripple marriage, devastate inner cities, and define the character of a generation of young adults. Peck, along with Steven Greenhouse of The New York Times, examine how the lack of work in America today is changing a nation.

So, when does the expiration date expire?
Before pouring the milk, some of us rely solely on the sniff test, while others toss it out the second it passes the "best by" date. But when does food actually start to deteriorate? Do those expiration dates really mean anything? Food writer Nadia Arumugam says those dates mean very little, and explains why she believe it's the food supply chain we should worry about, not the "sell-by" date.

The Making of a Terrorist
Three NPR reporters — West Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, counterterrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston, and Middle East correspondent Peter Kenyon — spent weeks investigating the life, education and eventual radicalization of Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, the man accused of attempting to blow up an airplane on its way to Detroit on Christmas Day. In this NPR investigative series, Going Radical, the three reporters each share what they learned about the young Nigerian man, including his upbringing, his early education and his connections to suspected terrorists and the American-born imam who was connected to the Ft. Hood shooter.

U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Christopher Hill
In Iraq, parliamentary elections are just a few weeks away, scheduled for March 7th, a few months later than initially planned. Squabbling has continued between parties and ethnic groups. And earlier this year, some 500 candidates were initially barred from running for office because of their ties to Saddam Hussein's Baath party. Christopher Hill, the U.S. ambassador to Iraq, takes your calls before heading back to Baghdad.

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