February 23rd Show

LEAD IMAGE i i

hide captionFormer Department of Justice official John Yoo testifies before the House Judiciary committee during a hearing on the administration's interrogation policy on June 26, 2008 in Washington, DC. Yoo has cited attorney-client privilege in avoiding answering specific questions about his involvement in drafting the controversial 2002 memo on interrogation techniques.

Melissa Golden/Getty Images
LEAD IMAGE

Former Department of Justice official John Yoo testifies before the House Judiciary committee during a hearing on the administration's interrogation policy on June 26, 2008 in Washington, DC. Yoo has cited attorney-client privilege in avoiding answering specific questions about his involvement in drafting the controversial 2002 memo on interrogation techniques.

Melissa Golden/Getty Images

John Yoo Defends 'Torture Memos'
The U.S. Department of Justice released a long-awaited report on Friday, rejecting sanctions against the former Bush Administration attorneys who wrote the legal memos that authorized the use of harsh interrogation techniques. John Yoo, one of the attorneys who helped pen the so-called "torture memos," and Jameel Jaffar, director of the ACLU National Security Project, discuss the DOJ's report, and the ongoing legal debate over harsh interrogation methods and executive power.

Most Believe In Miracles. Do You?
A recent survey from the Pew Forum on Religion showed that a vast majority of Americans — nearly 80% — believe in miracles. The results are from a wider look at "Religion Among the Millennials." Neal Conan talks with Greg Smith from the Pew Forum on Religion to talk about the widespread belief in miracles, and how most people define the term "miracle."

Can You Predict Violence?
Before Amy Bishop allegedly shot several colleagues at a University of Alabama campus, there were warning signs of violent behavior. Many college campuses across the country have threat assessment programs to spot potentially dangerous faculty, staff and students, to try to prevent violent incidents like the Alabama shooting. The members of two campus threat assessment teams explains the effectiveness of those programs in predicting violent behavior.

'Food, Inc.'
We go to grocery stores to purchase food we often assume is safe and nutritious. But how much do we really know about the products we buy? Filmmaker Robert Kenner talks about his film, Food, Inc., which divulges surprising and often shocking truths about what we eat, how it's made, what our nation has become, and where we are going from here.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: