March 17th Show

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A new survey on retirement confidence found that nearly a quarter of working Americans have less than $1,000 in savings and investments set aside for retirement. In our second hour, financial experts discuss how you can better prepare yourself for your golden years. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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A new survey on retirement confidence found that nearly a quarter of working Americans have less than $1,000 in savings and investments set aside for retirement. In our second hour, financial experts discuss how you can better prepare yourself for your golden years.

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The Political Junkie
On Capitol Hill, the Democratic leadership is pulling out all the stops to gain approval for the president's health care plan. With the 2010 elections approaching, undecided representatives are worried about how their votes will play back home. Political Junkie Ken Rudin talks about the sausage making in Congress, and the rest of the week's political news.

Flooding in the U.S.
Weekend storms overwhelmed much of the Northeast, toppling trees, flooding roads and forcing hundreds of people to evacuate their homes in Boston and other cities. And in the plains, towns along the Red River, including Fargo, North Dakota, are bracing for the river to crest sometime this weekend. Neal Conan talks to listeners affected by the floods.

Your (Not So) Golden Years
Nearly a quarter of working Americans in a new survey have less than $1,000 in savings and investments set aside for retirement. Fewer than one-half of those surveyed have even tried to calculate how much they SHOULD save to retire comfortably. These findings come from this year's survey on retirement confidence from the Employee Benefit Research Institute. EBRI's Jack Vanderhei and Washington Post syndicated personal financial columnist Michelle Singletary explain the waning confidence in retirement plans and what you can do to be better prepared for retirement.

'NASCAR's 190-m.p.h. Beanball'
In Nascar, wrecks, spins and wipeouts are part of the sport, and the thrill. Most crashes are accidents, but when driver Carl Edwards sent opponent Brad Keselowski's car flying into a wall earlier this month, Edwards unapologetically admitted the maneuver was payback for a dramatic hit from Keselowki last spring. Nascar historian Daniel Pierce argues it is racing's version of the beanball, and that new rules encouraging more aggressive racing are taking the sport back to its roots.

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