March 24th Show

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Two decades ago, Tim O'Brien wrote a landmark book The Things They Carried. He joins us in today's second hour Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hide caption

itoggle caption Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Political Junkie: Fallout from the Health Bill
Yesterday, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law. After months of legislative wrangling, the Democratic leadership in the House got several undecided Democrats to vote for the bill, and many of them will now likely face tough challenges in the fall elections. Former Republican congressman Vin Weber and Democratic pollster Anna Greenberg join Political Junkie Ken Rudin for a look ahead to how the health-care vote will play out at the polls in November.

USAID Head Rajiv Shah
Rajiv Shah took over as head of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) just days before the earthquake that crippled much of Haiti and sent his agency into crisis mode. Shah, previously an executive at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, talks about the U.S. response to Haiti, and USAID's role in providing humanitarian assistance around the world in support of U.S. foreign policy goals.

The Things They Carried Turns 20
In war, there are no winners. That's what readers have taken away from Tim O'Brien's landmark book about the Vietnam War, The Things They Carried, in the twenty years since it was published. O'Brien talks about what's changed since the book's publication, and what he still carries with him from his own experience in Vietnam.

The Art of Play-by-Play
Some moments in Major League Baseball will never be forgotten, and for each moment, there is a play-by-play announcer who uses lively catch-phrases and split-second calls to narrate history as it happens. But behind every perfect phrase and subtle allusion are hours of preparation. Jon Miller, the announcer for ESPN Sunday Night Baseball and the San Francisco Giants, talks about his career as a commentator and the art of play-by-play.

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