April 20th Show

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This secret iPhone prototype was posted to Gizmodo.com after it was accidentally left in a California bar by an Apple employee. In our second hour, Neal Conan talks to callers about their own work-related blunders. Gizmodo.com hide caption

itoggle caption Gizmodo.com

Haiti: As the Rains Come
Almost 100 days since the immense earthquake flattened much of Port-Au-Prince, and in many areas of Haiti residents continue to adjust. Millions of Haitians live in tents and under tarps and now face a new wave of danger: the onset of the rainy season and potentially deadly floods. Relief groups hope to move people out of high-risk areas and off of hillsides while working on long-term plans to rebuild homes and schools. Neal Conan revisits Haiti with Haitian-American writer Sylvana Joseph, Suzy DeFrancis of the American Red Cross, and Claude Jeudy of Habitat for Humanity.

The Lessons of Nelson Mandela
Nelson Mandela is one of modern history's most influential and admired figures. Time magazine editor Richard Stengel collaborated with Mandela on his autobiography, A Long Walk to Freedom, and spent nearly three years traveling with Mandela, tying his shoes, straightening his tie, and collecting hours and hours of conversation about Mandela's life. Today, Stengel talks about what he learned about Mandela, and his new book, Mandela's Way, Fifteen Lessons on Life, Love and Courage.

Lost iPhones and Other Workplace Blunders
A top secret, next generation iPhone was unveiled yesterday — but not by Apple. A software engineer at the always secretive company lost the prototype in a California bar while celebrating his 27th birthday. Whoever found the test phone eventually sold it to editors at Gizmodo.com, who proceeded to tear it open and share Apple's latest secrets with the world. Nick Denton of Gawker Media, the company that owns Gizmodo, talks about the deal that brought them the scoop. Denton is joined by Jesus Diaz, a senior editor at Gizmodo. And we want to hear from you. What's your biggest workplace blunder?

Remembering Dorothy Height
Legendary civil rights leader Dorothy Height died this morning, at 98. Height dedicated her life to empowering women and blacks, and lead the National Council of Negro Women for four decades. She was the only woman on the speaker's platform when Martin Luther King delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream" speech in 1963. Today, President Obama called Height a hero and, "the godmother of the civil rights movement." Guests remember the life and legacy of Dorothy Height.

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