April 27th Show

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Sting performs with the Philadelphia Orchestra during the orchestra's 153rd anniversary celebration at the Academy of Music January 30, 2010 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In our first hour, Sting talks about his upcoming world tour with the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra. William Thomas Cain/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption William Thomas Cain/Getty Images
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Sting performs with the Philadelphia Orchestra during the orchestra's 153rd anniversary celebration at the Academy of Music January 30, 2010 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In our first hour, Sting talks about his upcoming world tour with the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra.

William Thomas Cain/Getty Images

Remaking Wall Street, and Main Street
Yesterday, Senate Republicans blocked debate on a bill that would overhaul the U.S. financial system. The legislation calls for new requirements and regulations on the way financial institutions do business. A new poll shows that most Americans support stricter financial regulations. But when it comes to derivatives trading, leverage requirements, and "too big to fail," what does it all mean for most Americans? The Washington Post's Ezra Klein breaks down the basics of financial regulation, and answers your questions about the financial overhaul bill.

Sting Takes Your Calls
It's been over 30 years since British school teacher Gordon Sumner reinvented himself as the chart-topping, multi-award winning musician we now know as Sting. He's won sixteen Grammy awards, both as the lead singer and bassist of The Police, and as a solo artist. In addition to his music, for the past two decades he has campaigned for Amnesty International and established The Rainforest Foundation to lobby for the preservation of the Brazilian rainforest. Sting takes your calls about his career, his environmental activism, and his upcoming world tour with the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra.

Islamic Feminism
In many Islamic countries, attitudes toward women split between those looking to create political, economic and educational opportunities for women and those who condemn women's empowerment as anti-Islamic. Now, a new brand of feminism is taking hold in the Middle East and beyond, and more often than not, it's women who are leading the way. Isobel Coleman, senior fellow for U.S. foreign policy at the Council of Foreign Relations, talks about her new book, Paradise Beneath Her Feet: How Women Are Transforming the Middle East.

Is Goldman Criticism Anti-Semitic?
Goldman Sachs, the hugely profitable investment bank, has become a symbol of the financial excesses that helped to bring on the recession. Now, two of its executives will testify before Congress about its role in the mortgage crisis. The Atlantic's Michael Kinsle, writes that, "because Goldman is thought of as a "Jewish" firm, criticism of it, or of bankers generally, is often accused of anti-Semitism." He'll talk about what's behind the charge, and when, if ever, such accusations are fair. You can read his article that was written in January of this year here.

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