Dodging The Double Down

Two pieces of bacon. Two pieces of cheese. A bit of special sauce. Held together by — you guessed it — two pieces of chicken. At 540 calories, 32 grams of fat and 1,380 milligrams of sodium — the KFC Double Down is now available for your eating pleasure. I must say, it resembles a late-night "snack" some old roommates of mine concocted during the college years. And truth be told, I thought this sandwich was a joke that someone made and posted on bacon-lovin', deep-fried, high-calorie intake offered on the site This is Why You're Fat.

The Colonel's new delicacy of sorts is creating lots of buzz on the blogosphere. Check out what a few of the foodies and critics have to say:

NPR's Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me: "Seriously, this is rewriting the rules of lunch. And of sandwiches. We're going to replace peanut butter and jelly with chicken and chicken."

Gizmodo: "...if you attempt to consume this thing and use a touchscreen device—be it phone, tablet, ebook reader, or other—be prepared to render touchscreen device rank and unusable, its joys obscured by a thick film of fat and grease and sauce and self-loathing. Which would be a shame, since for every Double Down you eat you've got so much less time left on this earth to enjoy them."

Salon: "But, aside from greasier-than-normal fingers, it kind of doesn't work."

The health care bill is going to require fast food and other chain restaurants to post calorie counts for items on their menus. Couple that with The First Lady's campaign against childhood obesity, and it's safe to say that KFC couldn't have picked a better time to release the Double Down.

I'm not sure if I'll actually brave this beast of a meal (fries and drink included). But I am curious to see the promotion for the Double Down will get pushed to Big Mac level — catchy jingle and all. After all, they both contain "special sauce."

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