May 11th Show

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Job listings are posted on a bulletin board at the Career Link Center One Stop job center in San Francisco, California. In our first hour, Joel Kotkin and Michael Shires list the country's best places to find a job, and the cities you should avoid. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
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Job listings are posted on a bulletin board at the Career Link Center One Stop job center in San Francisco, California. In our first hour, Joel Kotkin and Michael Shires list the country's best places to find a job, and the cities you should avoid.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Where The Jobs Are
Every year, Joel Kotkin and Michael Shires compile a set of employment rankings: the "best and worst cities for jobs." This year, they call the results depressing to say the least. But, there are still rays of hope, like in Austin, Texas with its growing tech sector, and smaller cities, too, like Jacksonville, North Carolina. Kotkin and Shires talk about the best and worst cities to find a job.

Should Terror Suspects Get Miranda Rights?
After authorities arrested alleged Times Square bomber Faisal Shahzad they read him his Miranda rights. Some lawmakers have since argued that it was wrong to warn a terror suspect of his right to remain silent, and to consult an attorney. And over the weekend, Attorney General Eric Holder agreed that law enforcement officials may need more discretion to question suspected terrorists before they receive the Miranda warnings. Holder wants the Obama administration to work with Congress on possible limitations to the constitutional rights given to terror suspects, even for U.S. citizens. Sharon Bradford Franklin of the Constitution Project talks about the debate over changing the rules on Miranda rights.

Teach Like A Champion
Conventional wisdom says that good teachers are born, not made. And if you don't have that "teacher's magic," you may never be able to control a classroom, much less transform young minds. But Doug Lemov, the managing director of a network of charter schools in the Northeast, disagreed, and set out to prove it. Lemov spent years observing highly effective teachers, and has developed a set of simple techniques that he says can make anyone a great teacher. Lemov discusses his approach and his new book, Teach Like a Champion: 49 Techniques that Put Students on the Path to College.

Overseeing Oil Companies
The Obama administration today is expected to propose an overhaul for the Federal agency that oversees offshore drilling. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar will push to split the Minerals Management Service into two agencies: one would enforce safety rules and inspect oil rigs; the other would handle leases and collect billions of dollars in royalties from oil companies. Critics complain that the dual-mission of the current agency creates a conflict of interest, and that MMS is too cozy with the oil companies it regulates. Also today, the first congressional hearings begin into what caused the explosion and massive oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico. NPR's Brian Naylor talks about the hearing, what went wrong in the Gulf and the changes to come in oil regulation.

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