May 3rd Show

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Police stand by at sunrise at the scene where a crude car bomb had been parked in Times Square in New York City. In our first hour, WNYC reporter Arun Venugopal talks about the investigation into who is responsible for the foiled attack. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Chris Hondros/Getty Images
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Police stand by at sunrise at the scene where a crude car bomb had been parked in Times Square in New York City. In our first hour, WNYC reporter Arun Venugopal talks about the investigation into who is responsible for the foiled attack.

Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Times Square Car Bomb
Over the weekend, a vehicle containing a crude bomb was discovered in New York's Times Square. New York Police continue their search for the person who abandoned the explosives-packed SUV. Although the propane, gasoline and fertilizer did not detonate, city officials say it could've caused a lot of damage. Reporter Arun Venugopal, of member station WNYC, has the latest on the foiled attack and on the investigation into who engineered it.

Remembering Kent State, 40 Years Later
It's been forty years since National Guard troops opened fire on anti-war demonstrators at Kent State University and stunned the nation. On May 4, 1970, the students on the campus in Ohio gathered to protest the United States' involvement in the Vietnam War. The Ohio National Guard, in its attempts to disperse the crowd, shot and killed four people and wounded nine others. The event deeply divided the nation both politically and culturally, and many important questions remain in regards to why the Guardsmen shot into the crowd. Rebecca Roberts revisits the Kent State shootings with Dean Kahler, who was shot and paralyzed that day, Jerry Lewis, professor emeritus of sociology at Kent State University, and Gene Young, a witness to the Jackson State killings that happened 10 days later. To view a retrospective of Kent State, click here.

Oil Spill Affect on Livelihood
Fishermen and other business owners along the Gulf Coast can do little more than wait as millions of gallons of oil drift closer to shore. Tuesday marks two weeks since the explosion that sunk a deep-sea drilling rig and left at least 210,000 gallons gushing into the Gulf every day. Fishing boats sit idle at the dock, restaurant owners worry about their supply of seafood and many coastal towns fear the spill will devastate their tourism industry. We'll hear the latest on the oil spill and how it's affecting those whose livelihoods depend on the Gulf Coast.

Opinion Page: 'A Spill of Our Own'
As oil continues to leak into Gulf Coast waters, political fallout from the oil rig disaster is also bubbling to the surface. Policymakers in Washington are now calling for a reassessment of offshore oil exploration, as well as congressional hearings to assess the spill. In an opinion piece in the New York Times, Lisa Margonelli, executive director of the New America Foundation's energy initiative, writes that "every gallon of gas is a gallon of risks." She argues that all oil must come from someone's backyard— be it Louisianans or Nigerians, and there are no simple answers unless the United States addresses its growing oil consumption.

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