June 9th Show

Former Army Major Michelle Dyarman i i

hide captionFormer Army Major Michelle Dyarman suffered head injuries in two roadside bomb explosions and a Humvee accident.  She says the military misdiagnosed her brain injuries and she's had to fight for proper medical treatment. In today's 2nd hour, we'll talk about NPR's investigation into missed diagnoses of traumatic brain injury in the U.S. military.

Courtesy of Michelle Dyarman
Former Army Major Michelle Dyarman

Former Army Major Michelle Dyarman suffered head injuries in two roadside bomb explosions and a Humvee accident.  She says the military misdiagnosed her brain injuries and she's had to fight for proper medical treatment. In today's 2nd hour, we'll talk about NPR's investigation into missed diagnoses of traumatic brain injury in the U.S. military.

Courtesy of Michelle Dyarman

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