Read Albright's Pins, And See Them In DC

Serpent i i

Then Secretary of State Madeleine Albright wore this serpent to a meeting in Iraq, after the government-controlled Iraqi press published a poem referring to Albright as an “unparalleled serpent.” Spencer Platt/Getty hide caption

itoggle caption Spencer Platt/Getty
Serpent

Then Secretary of State Madeleine Albright wore this serpent to a meeting in Iraq, after the government-controlled Iraqi press published a poem referring to Albright as an “unparalleled serpent.”

Spencer Platt/Getty

One of our favorite guests in recent years has been Madeleine Albright.  The former Secretary of State is charming on-air, one of those guests who is best able to translate a somewhat intimidating intelligence into a great interview.

She's well known for her brooch collection, which she described on TOTN at the conclusion of an interview on the fall of the Berlin Wall. "It's a lot of fun because I love to talk about foreign policy. But with the jewelry, it's like with a spoonful of sugar."  That day, she chose to wear a large sun on her lapel, "because I do think that there was such an opening and brightness that came as a result of the fall of the wall, and sunlight for a lot of people that had been in the dark for a long time."  See? Diplomacy through fashion.  She's pretty cool.

And now, she's in the Smithsonian — or, rather, her collection is.  "Read My Pins" (after her book of the same name) opened Friday, and you can bet this blogger's going to make time to visit.  If you're not lucky enough to  live in Washington, you can get a preview here. It looks fantastic, from the shattered glass brooch she wore to celebrate Hillary Clinton's appointment as Secretary of State, to the "hear no evil, speak no evil, see no evil" monkey pins she wore as a warning to Vladimir Putin: "One of the issues I wanted to raise was Russia's callous attitude toward human rights in the region of Chechnya ... He saw no evil; hence my pins.”

 

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