June 23rd Show

Gen. Stanley McChrystal (C) arrives at the White House to meet with President Obama. i i

U.S. commander in Afghanistan Gen. Stanley McChrystal (C) arrives at the White House. President Barack Obama is to confront McChrystal for disparaging remarks McChrystal made in a magazine article.  In our first hour, guests explain why they believe McChrystal left the President no choice but to fire him. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images
Gen. Stanley McChrystal (C) arrives at the White House to meet with President Obama.

U.S. commander in Afghanistan Gen. Stanley McChrystal (C) arrives at the White House. President Barack Obama is to confront McChrystal for disparaging remarks McChrystal made in a magazine article.  In our first hour, guests explain why they believe McChrystal left the President no choice but to fire him.

Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

The Political Junkie
President Obama dresses down General Stanley McChrystal at the White House, the trial of former Illinois Governor turned reality TV contestant Rod Blagojevich continues, and runoff elections in South Carolina bring big changes to the Republican party in that state. The Political Junkie Ken Rudin and Neal Conan focus on the new faces rising to the top of the GOP in South Carolina — and he throws out a new trivia question.

Fire McChrystal
President Obama met face-to-face for about 30 minutes this morning with General Stanley McChrystal. The top U.S. commander in Afghanistan was summoned to the White House to explain the disparaging remarks he made about members of the Obama administration in an interview with Rolling Stone magazine. A presidential historian and a retired general each explain why they believe McChrystal left the president no choice but to fire him.

Interpreting the Constitution
Elena Kagan, President Obama's pick for the Supreme Court, is preparing to face tough questions next week when her senate confirmation hearings begin. One of the issues she can expect to be quizzed about is the question of how she interprets the Constitution. Many conservatives fear that she will be a liberal "activist judge" and interpret the constitution as what's known as a living constitutionalist.  Meanwhile, some Democrats worry that she's too centrist and will lean towards interpreting the constitution literally, as an originalist or textualist.  But what are these different ways to read the constitution?  What do they mean?  And why is it important?  Neal Conan will talk to Los Angeles Times correspondent David Savage and with two legal experts with differing views of the best way to interpret the constitution:  John McGinnis of Northwestern University and Dahlia Lithwick of Slate magazine.

Crime and Illegal Immigration
Last weekend, the New York Times ran a story claiming that illegal immigration in Arizona hasn't resulted in a rise in crime on the border as many have claimed. Rather, since 2000, the paper reported a drop in crime based on FBI figures.  Northeastern University law professor and crime expert James Alan Fox analyzed the data, and explains why he believes crime statistics have no place in the debate over illegal immigration.