July 13th show

The North Tower of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. i i

hide captionFire and smoke billow from the north tower of New York's World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 after terrorists crashed two hijacked airliners into the World Trade Center and brought down the twin 110-story towers.

David Karp/AP Photo
The North Tower of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001.

Fire and smoke billow from the north tower of New York's World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 after terrorists crashed two hijacked airliners into the World Trade Center and brought down the twin 110-story towers.

David Karp/AP Photo

Why Facts Don't Change Minds
Facts often don't matter, especially in political arguments. New research suggests that misinformed people rarely change their minds when presented with the facts, and often become even more attached to their beliefs. The phenomenon is called backfire and it plays an important role in how we shape and solidify our political beliefs. It also raises questions about a key principle of a strong democracy: that a well-informed electorate is better than one that is not informed, or is misinformed.  Dana Milbank, national Political Columnist for the Washington Post, joins Neal Conan, along with Brendan Nyhan, a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at the University of Michigan.

History's Most Influential Battle
We think of ancient Rome as consistently victorious.  But its defeat at the hands of Carthage in 216 B.C. has been one of the most studied and imitated battles of all time.  The battle at Cannae during the Second Punic War was the costliest day of combat for any army in history.  Robert L. O'Connell tells the story of Carthage's unexpected victory, and Hannibal, the general that made it possible. O'Connell's book is entitled, Ghosts of Cannae.

The Life of an Unpaid Intern
Forget the summer gig at the burger joint.  Many college students and new grads are now dying to land a coveted (and often unpaid) internship. But as companies look to cut costs, some have canceled intern programs, while others face tough questions about the way they use interns. While many students can't afford to work without pay, others see unpaid gigs as the only way to get a foot in the door of competitive industries, and in some cases are willing to spend thousands of dollars to work for free. New York Times correspondent Steven Greenhouse talks about the changing rules and ethics of internships, and the lengths students are going to get one.

Is Yemen the New Afghanistan?
Racked by political chaos and tribal feuds, Yemen is one of the Middle East's poorest countries. It's also increasingly a base of operations for al-Qaida propaganda and attacks on the United States and other nations. The 2000 bombing of the USS Cole was followed eight years later by a deadly attack on the U.S. Embassy. Last year's Christmas Day plot to blow up a U.S. airliner also linked back to Yemen. New York Times reporter Robert Worth has been tracing the growing power of al-Qaida militants in Yemen, and talks about why that country may be the next Afghanistan.

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