July 21st Show

What's being done to stop childhood hunger in America? i i

Connie Williamson of Carlisle, Pa., struggles to get enough food to feed her family each month. Williamson's budget has to feed her family of five, including a pregnant daughter, along with two needy relatives. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Pam Fessler/NPR
What's being done to stop childhood hunger in America?

Connie Williamson of Carlisle, Pa., struggles to get enough food to feed her family each month. Williamson's budget has to feed her family of five, including a pregnant daughter, along with two needy relatives.

Pam Fessler/NPR

The Political Junkie
Washington is buzzing about one lady: Shirley Sherrod.  She's the former head of the Department of Agriculture’s rural development office in Georgia who was forced to resign after an edited video clip posted online by a conservative activist accused her of admitting racism while speaking at an N.A.A.C.P. event. Now, after a longer clip of the speech was released, everyone is taking a second look at the incident. U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has said he would review his decision to ask Sherrod to step down.  Our Political Junkie, Ken Rudin, talks about reactions to the incident, and looks closer at the hypercharged environment that created these "viral politics."

The Blagojevitch Trial
For two weeks, an expletive-laced drama has unfolded in a federal courthouse in Chicago. Rod Blagojevich, the former Illinois governor-turned radio host-turned reality TV personality, is on trial for trying to cash in on President Obama's former Senate seat. Corruption is part and parcel of political life in Illinois, but the hours of colorful secret FBI tapes being revealed in court have Illinois voters riveted. Chicago Tribune political correspondent Rick Pearson shares highlights from the trial, and assesses the case's potential impact on the upcoming election season.

Fighting Childhood Hunger in America
The Obama administration has pledged to end childhood hunger in the United States by 2015.  However, millions of kids cannot get enough to eat at home, and that number is going up, not down.  NPR's Pam Fessler has been covering this story in a two-part series for Morning Edition and All Things Considered.  Fessler talks about childhood hunger, the tug of war between nutrition and frugality, and what's being done to alleviate the problem.

The Line Between Historical Fact and Fiction
Murder, war, lies, deceit. For anyone who's studied Tudor history, this period of time played host to some of the most significant and salacious monarchs in English history. Historian Alison Weir has conducted exhaustive academic research into the lives, personalities and eccentricities of the most notable Tudors: Henry VIII and his daughter Elizabeth I. But, unlike other historians, Weir has also used her historical knowledge to write works of fiction.  Her novels take us into the world of the Tudor court, where historical elements intertwine with imaginative, ferocious fiction. Weir explains the line between writing history and writing fiction.

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