July 29th Show

Opponents of Arizona's immigration enforcement law SB 1070 celebrate. i i

Opponents of Arizona's immigration enforcement law SB 1070 celebrate after it was announced that a judge blocked some controversial provisions of the law in Phoenix. In our first hour, guests explain what's next for immigration enforcement. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption John Moore/Getty Images
Opponents of Arizona's immigration enforcement law SB 1070 celebrate.

Opponents of Arizona's immigration enforcement law SB 1070 celebrate after it was announced that a judge blocked some controversial provisions of the law in Phoenix. In our first hour, guests explain what's next for immigration enforcement.

John Moore/Getty Images

What's Next for Arizona's Immigration Law?
Arizona's controversial new immigration law takes effect today without many of the toughest requirements. A federal judge yesterday blocked portions of SB 1070 that require police officers to verify a person's status when there is reasonable suspicion that they may be an undocumented immigrant. Judge Susan Bolton also blocked an element of the law that requires immigrants to carry their papers. Arizona Governor Jan Brewer called the preliminary injunction "a bump in the road." Polls show a slim majority of Americans support Arizona's approach. But critics fear that the law will lead to harassment of Latinos and wrongful arrests of legal resident aliens. Guest host Tony Cox talks with NPR's Ted Robbins and others about the law and what's next for immigration enforcement.

How to Read Leaked Documents
Thousands of pages filled with military slang, dashed off in an instant and focused on the aspects of the war that are arguably the least important — this is how Noah Shachtman sums up the 92,000 classified documents released earlier this week on WikiLeaks. Shachtman is the editor of Wired's national security blog, Danger Room, and a non-resident fellow at the Brookings Institution. He witnessed as an embedded reporter one of the battles described in the leaked papers and says the report doesn't reflect the reality of events on the ground. He explains why the documents don't give us the full picture of what really happened in Afghanistan and tell us how best to read them.

Authors Explain Why They Write

Cold Feet at the Altar
It's summertime, and that means wedding season. But for some brides and grooms-to-be, even a heat wave isn't enough to ward off cold feet. Sometimes mom and dad, or the pressure or expense of a pending wedding, can cloud a soon-to-be-spouse's judgment about whether or not to call the whole thing off. Amy Dickinson of the syndicated column Ask Amy talks about how to handle degrees of cold and cool feet, and how to tell the difference.

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