August 3rd Show

U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. i i

hide captionU.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius delivers remarks on the Affordable Care Act at George Washington University Hospital in Washington, DC. In our first hour, Secretary Sebelius talks about the challenges of implementing a massive healthcare overhaul.

Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images
U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius.

U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius delivers remarks on the Affordable Care Act at George Washington University Hospital in Washington, DC. In our first hour, Secretary Sebelius talks about the challenges of implementing a massive healthcare overhaul.

Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Health Secretary Kathleen Sebelius
Kathleen Sebelius has a huge job ahead of her. As Secretary of Health and Human Services, she is responsible for implementing the massive healthcare overhaul that President Obama signed into law in March.  She also oversees Medicare and Medicaid,  and last month she took charge of the president's new national strategy for HIV and AIDS. She faces daunting challenges—twenty-one states challenged the legality of the Obama administration's healthcare overhaul in court. A judge in Virginia yesterday refused to block one suit against the federal law. And voters in Missouri today weigh-in on a measure that would overturn key parts of the overhaul in that state.  Secretary Sebelius joins guest host Tony Cox and takes your calls.

Clergy Burnout
Members of the clergy suffer from higher rates of depression, obesity and high blood pressure and many are burning out. Priests, ministers, rabbis and imams are generally driven by a sense of duty to answer calls for help, and do the best they can to serve others.  But research shows that in many cases, they rarely find time for themselves. As financial and volunteer support has dwindled in recent years, some pastors and priests (especially those in smaller congregations) act as a jack of all trades in addition to preparing their weekly sermon. Paul Vitello of The New York Times and Robin Swift of the Clergy Health Initiative at Duke University explain why members of the clergy are burning out, and how many faiths are now offering programs to address the issue of clergy burnout.

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