August 9th Show

The impact of foreclosures on children. i i

hide captionAnnie Thomas holds her pet rabbit in the foreclosed Miami home that she and her family reoccupied after busting the locks and moving in with the help of the activist group Take Back the Land. In our first hour, guests look at the unique impact foreclosure has on children.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images
The impact of foreclosures on children.

Annie Thomas holds her pet rabbit in the foreclosed Miami home that she and her family reoccupied after busting the locks and moving in with the help of the activist group Take Back the Land. In our first hour, guests look at the unique impact foreclosure has on children.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Kids: Foreclosures' Hidden Victims
In the first half of 2010, banks took 528,000 homes, putting the U.S. on track to beat last year's total of more than 900,000 foreclosures. Many economists see little relief from the mortgage crisis before 2013 as prices and values are likely to remain low over the next two years. While the loss of a home can be deeply traumatic for a family, guests look at the unique impact of a foreclosure on children.

Ted Koppel on Why We Need a War Tax
NPR Senior News Analyst Ted Koppel talks about what he calls a lack of "shared sacrifice" when it comes to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The Anatomy of Disasters
A major plane crash, a bridge collapse or an oil spill—man-made disasters often have one thing in common: complacency. Managers who don't think things can go wrong, faulty technology and really bad luck can all lead to costly mishaps. But what steps can be taken to prevent calamities before they happen? William Reilly of President Obama's National Oil Spill Commission, James Bagian, a former astronaut who helped investigate Challenger and Columbia shuttle disasters, and Beverly Sauer of West Virginia's Special Commission on the Sago Mine Disaster each explore how to recognize cultures of complacency before disaster strikes. James Bagian examines human error and patient safety in the "The Wrong Stuff" blog for Slate.

Most Egregious Tipos..er..Typos
Have you ever seen a typo on a sign that was so egregious you wanted to grab a ladder, climb up and correct it on the spot? Jeff Deck did and his correction quest led him to change typos all over the United States. Deck and his co-author, Benjamin D. Herson, tell the story of their attempts to rectify each misspelling, dangling modifier and gross misuse of quotation marks in his new book The Great Typo Hunt: Two Friends Changing the World, One Correction at a Time.

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