August 18th Show

The U.S. Constitution

hide captionIn our second hour, guests talk about the Republican push to revise the 14th Amendment and change the rules of citizenship.

Courtesy of Archives.gov

The Political Junkie
Blagojevich claims victory with only one felony conviction, but may be back in court soon. Murray and Dino score wins in the race for senate in Washington State. Tea Party favorite Joe Miller gears up for Alaska's primary, and the heat is on in Arizona and Florida where the candidates have thick wallets and immigration has voters riled up. It's Political Junkie day and Ken Rudin is back with this week's trivia question and a look at all the latest news in politics.

Iran's Green Revolution
Iran's protest-driven Green Revolution has fizzled.  New Yorker magazine Reporter Jon Lee Anderson visited Iran earlier this summer and spoke with members of Iran's reform movement as well as Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.  His conclusion: Under intense pressure from government supporters, "the Green Movement has effectively ceased to exist as a visible political force."  Anderson talks about his latest article, what he learned about politics in Iran, it's nuclear ambitions, and his impression of Ahmadinejad.

"Anchor Babies" and the 14th Amendment
After Arizona passed its controversial immigration law, a new battle erupted over what critics call "anchor babies."  Senator Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) argued that illegal immigrants come the the United States with the intent to have babies, which are automatically granted citizenship under the constitution.  He's called for a review of that policy, and the 14th Amendment.  Host Neal Conan discusses the citizenship clause of the U.S. Constitution and efforts to amend it with attorney Walter Dellinger III. He'll also read from opinion pieces with differing views of so-called "anchor babies" and whether or not to redefine citizenship.

Swift Water Rescue

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: