August 31st Show

Betty and Jack O'Connor of Chevy Chase, Maryland. i

Betty and Jack O'Connor want to stay in their Chevy Chase, Md. home as they age and are trying to create a network of volunteers in their neighborhood, called a "village," to help them with tasks they can no longer handle. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jennifer Ludden/NPR
Betty and Jack O'Connor of Chevy Chase, Maryland.

Betty and Jack O'Connor want to stay in their Chevy Chase, Md. home as they age and are trying to create a network of volunteers in their neighborhood, called a "village," to help them with tasks they can no longer handle.

Jennifer Ludden/NPR

Sacred Secular Spaces
Last week's rally at the time and place of the "I Have A Dream" speech, and the controversy over the building of the Islamic cultural center near ground zero, raise questions about the appropriate use of spaces that some people hold sacred. Many consider ground zero hallowed ground — as well as the battlefield at Gettysburg, Kent State, and the site of the Oklahoma City bombing, among many others. These places often have nothing to do with religion. So, what characteristics must a site have to be considered sacred in the public eye? Kenneth Foote of the University of Colorado at Boulder, and Simon Stow of the College of William and Mary talk about the meaning and politics of secular sacred spaces.

Middle East Peace Talks
A new round of direct negotiations between the Israeli Government and the Palestinian Authority begin this week in Washington. Publicly, President Abbas and Prime Minister Netanyahu have said they welcome the latest round of the peace process, but it remains to be seen how this time will be different from previous attempts to hammer out a peace deal.  NPR diplomatic correspondent Michele Keleman talks about the stakes and the expectations for the meetings this week, and the schedule for the year-long talks.

Growing Old At Home

With the first Baby Boomers turning 65 next year, the number of seniors in America will more than double in coming decades. And while many equate aging with living in a nursing facility, the vast majority of seniors grow old at home. New services and technologies help make that possible. But with such a large and growing demographic to accommodate, families, communities and municipalities will be challenged to meet the needs of an aging population.  NPR's Jennifer Ludden and Elinor Ginzler of the AARP talk about aging while staying put, and some innovative solutions that are already helping some seniors thrive at home.

"Body Work"
For over two decades, private investigator V.I. Warshawski, the heroine in author Sara Paretsky's series of mystery novels, has been on the case righting wrongs on the streets of Chicago. In Body Work,  the fourteenth book in the series, V.I. Warshawski finds herself uncovering a murder that involves both an Iraq war conspiracy and the world of performance art.  Paretsky talks about her latest novel and her career as an author.

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