September 1st show

A video recording shows a trapped Chilean miner. i i

hide captionRelatives show a video recorded with a camera in a probe of the miners still trapped inside the San Esteban company's San Jose gold and copper mine.  In our second hour, we'll talk about the psychology of being trapped, and what's ahead for the miners and their rescuers in the coming weeks.

Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images
A video recording shows a trapped Chilean miner.

Relatives show a video recorded with a camera in a probe of the miners still trapped inside the San Esteban company's San Jose gold and copper mine.  In our second hour, we'll talk about the psychology of being trapped, and what's ahead for the miners and their rescuers in the coming weeks.

Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

The Political Junkie

There's still another major round of primaries left in 2010, but the true political junkies have their eyes locked on November's midterm elections. And the top issues seem clear: The economy, tax cuts, Afghanistan, health care, gay marriage and immigration.  This week, NPR's own Political Junkie Ken Rudin looks at the ideas, issues and races that will determine the mid-term elections. And host Neal Conan speaks with Democratic pollster Anna Greenberg and Republican strategist Alex Vogel about what will make the difference on election day.

Best (and Worst) Books About The Iraq War
Last night, President Obama declared the official end of the U.S. combat mission in Iraq. For more than seven years, Americans learned about the war from news reports. But between headlines, many also turned to books to understand the strategy and the lessons of the conflict. As the insurgency in Iraq grew, hundreds of stories — fiction and non-fiction — surfaced from correspondents, ground troops, academics and politicians. As "Operation New Dawn" officially begins today, author Thomas Ricks talks about the best and the worst literature of the Iraq war.

Trapped Chilean Miners
The 33 miners trapped 1/2-mile underground in Chile likely face months of isolation.  Rescuers called in experts from NASA for advice on how to keep the men safe and mentally sound until their rescue.  Among the lessons, according to The Washington Post: make note of night and day, even if you can't see the sunlight; make friends, but not cliques; value privacy, but don't become a loner.  Workers are also looking to other isolating experiences for lessons: ships stuck in ice, long-term hostage situations and P-O-W camps, among others.  Neal Conan talks about the psychology of being trapped, and the difficult job ahead for the miners and their rescuers.

"Mosquito" Audio Repellent
An ear-piercing screech now greets many commuters outside a Washington, D.C. Metro stop. Local business owners found a solution to the problem of loitering teenagers in the Gallery Place shopping area: an audio repellent called The Mosquito. The device emits a high-pitched sound that drives teens crazy but can't be heard by most adults over 25. While some teens complain that the noise is too jarring, schools and businesses across the nation see it as a tactic for fending off trespassers.  Howard Stapleton, the inventor of The Mosquito, talks about how his product works and why people are using it.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: