Vicariously Attending The World Equestrian Games

Julie Rovner i

NPR's Julie Rovner with one of 80 "Horse Mania" horses in Lexington, KY., site of the 2010 World Equestrian Games. The horses will be auctioned off this December, just like thoroughbred yearlings. Courtesy of Julie Rovner hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Julie Rovner
Julie Rovner

NPR's Julie Rovner with one of 80 "Horse Mania" horses in Lexington, KY., site of the 2010 World Equestrian Games. The horses will be auctioned off this December, just like thoroughbred yearlings.

Courtesy of Julie Rovner

Like most little girls, I was once obsessed with horses. But, alas, growing up near downtown Seattle, my entire experience with horseback riding was limited to two weeks of horse camp at the age of 11.

So, despite grand visions of becoming a champion horse jumper, that plan never quite panned out. And while my interests soon shifted from horses to — well, let's face it, boys — I still harbor a wee hope that I may one day learn to ride at a pace faster than a slow walk. In the meantime, I love to watch equestrian competitions when I happen to find them on television (not quite the same thing, is it?).

I was delighted to learn, then, that our own Health Policy Correspondent Julie Rovner is an accomplished equestrian — she's not only a horse owner and rider, but also an amateur competitor. Julie will be on the program today, recounting her experiences observing last weekend's 2010 World Equestrian Games in Lexington, Ky. If you, like me, cling to the wild hope that you will one day end up in a show ring with a mighty steed, well, listening to Julie may be the next best thing.

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