November 17th Show

Chef Jamie Oliver i i

British chef Jamie Oliver is seen with his new book 'Jamie's America' during a book signing session in London, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2009. In our first hour, Oliver talks about his search for quintessential American food. Sang Tan/AP Photo hide caption

itoggle caption Sang Tan/AP Photo
Chef Jamie Oliver

British chef Jamie Oliver is seen with his new book 'Jamie's America' during a book signing session in London, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2009. In our first hour, Oliver talks about his search for quintessential American food.

Sang Tan/AP Photo

The Political Junkie
The Tea Party claimed yet another victory this week, and this one wasn't in a campaign. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell — known for bringing hundreds of millions of dollars worth of pet projects home to Kentucky — changed course and promised to ban earmarks. It could be an indicator of what's to come in a more partisan Congress, under the growing influence of the Tea Party. Political editor Ken Rudin and Neal Conan talk with retiring Democrat Rep. Bart Stupak about what role he sees for moderates in the next Congress. And, Alaska Public Radio's Libby Casey will give an update from the ongoing vote count in the Alaska senate race.

Chef Jamie Oliver
When British chef Jamie Oliver took a road-trip looking for quintessential American food, he found there was no such thing.  He did manage to get to the heart of what American food was all about — past the super-sized burgers and junk food.  He found and collected a diverse and delicious group of recipes. The result is Jamie Oliver's America. Oliver talks about his trip, and the recipes he re-invented.

21 & Disabled
Olivia Welter has been severely disabled since birth. She relies on a ventilator tube, feeding tube, and a mix of other tubes and devices to keep her healthy. For all of her twenty-one years she's received round the clock intensive care at home, paid for by an in-home program for children like her. On her 21st birthday, when she reached adulthood, she was no longer eligible for that coverage and her parents now struggle to provide the care that has kept their daughter alive and healthy all these years. Host Neal Conan talks with Olivia's mother Tamara, along with NPR investigative reporter Joseph Shapiro, about the fight that many families are facing to continue caring for their disabled children at home.

Actor David Suchet
Actor David Suchet has had his turn on the stage, television, and the big screen. But despite roles in Amadeus, The Falcon and the Snowman, and many other films, and more than a decade with the Royal Shakespeare Company, Suchet is best known as the embodiment of Agatha Christie's well-loved but somewhat disagreeable Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot. Suchet first starred as the mustachioed sleuth for British television more than two decades ago, and has been a thorn in the side of genteel murderers ever since. One of his most recent performances is a stylish adaptation of one of Christie's most famous books, Murder on the Orient Express. Suchet joins host Neal Conan to discuss his career and what even Christie called a "bombastic, tiresome little man."

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