December 2nd Show

Changes in open enrollment i i

In our first hour, NPR's Julie Rovner talks about the changes in open enrollment for your health benefits. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com
Changes in open enrollment

In our first hour, NPR's Julie Rovner talks about the changes in open enrollment for your health benefits.

iStockphoto.com

Anatomy of a Terror Investigation
Last week, the FBI arrested 19-year old Mohamed Osman Mohamud for plotting to bomb the annual Christmas tree lighting in downtown Portland, Oregon. Mohamud, a Somali-American, is only the most recent alleged terrorism suspect to be arrested in an FBI sting operation: investigations in which agents have impersonated terrorists, developed plots alongside the suspects, and helped provide fake explosives. Critics of the stings say they verge on entrapment, duping small-time terrorism apologists who would never have the ability to carry out dangerous plots on their own. Investigators insist that if they hadn't tracked them down first, the plotters would have connected with another group or individual with potentially violent results. NPR counter-terrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston joins host Tony Cox to discuss the FBI's recent terrorism sting operations, and why the entrapment defense has failed for every terror defendant who has tried it since 9/11.

Open Enrollment & The New Health Law
It's open enrollment time... that time of the year when we reconsider our health benefits, accounts and drug plans. And this year, there's a twist—the healthcare overhaul changes some co-pays, coverage for adult children and the rules on what's covered in flexible spending accounts. Many employees have another week or two to choose their health options, while millions of seniors will choose between Medicare coverage and a privately-run Medicare Advantage plan. Today, guest host Tony Cox talks to NPR's health policy correspondent Julie Rovner about the changes for open enrollment.

The Burden of the Bullied
Childhood bullying is an age-old problem, but researchers are just beginning to understand how the effects of the abuse lingers in victims into young adulthood, middle age and even retirement. A recent Boston Globe series on bullying reviewed more than 100 accounts of people who were bullied. In many cases, memories of repeated fights on the playground and systemic name-calling hinder victims in nearly every aspect of their lives, from education and career choices, to social interactions and emotional well-being. Guest host Tony Cox talks with Jenna Russell of The Boston Globe, Alan Eisenberg, who was bullied in school, and others about the psychological long-term effects of bullying, and the strain it puts on people's lives long after the harassment stops.

LeBron James Returns to Cleveland
LeBron James makes his return to Cleveland tonight. The Akron native spent the first seven years of his career in Northeast Ohio with the Cleveland Cavaliers. When James became a free agent last summer, he dangled the prospect of staying near home and continuing with the Cavs... only to draw the process out on live television and announce he'd be "taking his talents to South Beach." Now, he and the struggling Miami Heat make the trip to Cleveland to play his former team. Guest host Tony Cox talks with with East Cleveland native and culture writer Jimi Izrael about the reception James can expect when he returns home.

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