December 22nd Show

Shoppers along Chicago's Magnificent Mile i i

Shoppers carry their purchases along the Magnificent Mile shopping district November 30, 2010 in Chicago, Illinois. According to The Conference Board's index, U.S. consumer confidence rose in November to the highest level in five months to 54.1. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Scott Olson/Getty Images
Shoppers along Chicago's Magnificent Mile

Shoppers carry their purchases along the Magnificent Mile shopping district November 30, 2010 in Chicago, Illinois. According to The Conference Board's index, U.S. consumer confidence rose in November to the highest level in five months to 54.1.

Scott Olson/Getty Images

The Political Junkie
It's Political Junkie day, and our guest junkie Mara Liasson will be counting down the winners and losers in reapportionment.  And now that the Census numbers have come out, some states have won seats, and some have lost a few.  We'll also talk with Pennsylvania Democratic and Republican leaders about the rules of redistricting, and which party might benefit from the new numbers.  And as usual, host Neal Conan and our guest junkie will catch you up on all the political news of the week: from an active lame duck Congress, to the people you're going to miss when the freshman head to the Capitol in January.

Shopping Divide
Economists declared the recession officially over, but the pace of recovery has been starkly uneven across income levels. That fact is creating a deeply polarized Christmas for shoppers this holiday season. While high-end stores like Tiffany's report significant gains in sales, Wal-Mart sees a flood of shoppers rushing to buy baby formula as soon as unemployment checks come through.  Neal Conan talks with Washington Post retail reporter Ylan Mui about the shopping divide playing out in stores across the country this year.

"Begat"
The King James Bible has contributed more to the English language than any other literary source, argues linguist David Crystal.  In his latest book, Begat, Crystal sets out to prove it — and you may be surprised at how often phrases from the good book have made their way into your daily life. If you've ever "fought the good fight" when you felt like "a voice crying in the wilderness," or chuckled at "what comes out of the mouths of babes," you've only scratched the surface. David Crystal explains just how much the King James Bible has done for modern English, and just why so many phrases have stuck with us.

TBA

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