Uh-Oh! In 2011, Where Do The Eye Holes Go?

Glasses i

For 10 years, makers of novelty New Year's glasses had it easy. In 2011, not so much. Mo Riza/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Mo Riza/Flickr
Glasses

For 10 years, makers of novelty New Year's glasses had it easy. In 2011, not so much.

Mo Riza/Flickr

The 2000s were, clearly, a cinch. The 90s had a certain googly charm. But what in the world are the makers of novelty New Year's glasses to do with 2011?

Never fear, the Wall Street Journal's on it. Nando DiFino talked with Pat Shea, who owns a novelty sunglasses store online.

Many distributors, including Shea’s Shades of Fun, passed over a design consisting of regular lenses with the 2010 perched on top last year, she said. The New Year’s consumer, Shea reasoned, would want to ogle Carson Daly or Dick Clark while looking through the numbers — not peering from behind regular frames with plastic digits hovering in front of the wearer’s forehead.

Ok, so looking through the numbers is clearly pretty important. Got it.  But is peering through a skinny 1 — take your pick of which in 2011 — really a better look?

WSJ sports columnist Jason Gay spotted a pair of 2011 glasses that widened up the 1s and awkwardly placed the second lens inside one of them. Other vendors are selling frames that join the double 1s at the bottom and place the second lens inside the resulting cradle shape. The look reads more like "20-U" than "2011."

You be the judge.  And to see Shea's pick, click.

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