January 4th show

U.S. Navy Capt. Owen Honors i i

hide captionIn this frame grab taken from video obtained by the Virginian-Pilot newspaper, U.S. Navy Capt. Owen Honors appears in one of a series of profanity-laced comedy sketches that were broadcast on the USS Enterprise via closed-circuit television.

The Virginian Pilot/AP Photo
U.S. Navy Capt. Owen Honors

In this frame grab taken from video obtained by the Virginian-Pilot newspaper, U.S. Navy Capt. Owen Honors appears in one of a series of profanity-laced comedy sketches that were broadcast on the USS Enterprise via closed-circuit television.

The Virginian Pilot/AP Photo

Shipboard Culture
The Navy is expected to relieve Capt. Owen Honors of his command today.  He's the officer who made and starred in raunchy videos that aired on board the U.S.S. Enterprise several years ago while Honors was second in command.  The Navy continues its investigation into the videos which included gay slurs and staged racy shower scenes, among other content that the Navy yesterday deemed "clearly inappropriate." Many former and current sailors were disappointed and outraged by the videos, calling on the Navy to strip the captain of his command. But defenders say that the videos were intended to humor the sailors and that Capt. Honors shouldn't face harsh punishment. Neal Conan talks with Ward Carroll of Military.com and retired Navy Capt. Rosemary Mariner about the latest on the investigation and what — if anything — it reveals about shipboard culture.

Net Delusions
From bloggers and tweeters in Burma's Saffron Revolution, to Iranian protesters after the election — the Internet was lauded as a tool to promote change and democracy in the world.  But Evgeny Morozov, author of The Net Delusion, argues it hasn't worked out that way.  Neal Conan talks to Morozov about his book, the ways that many repressive regimes are seizing their own online opportunities, and his argument that technology has helped dictators and made world politics more combustible.

Stuttering
The film The King's Speech, tells the story of King George VI and his struggle to overcome stuttering. The movie has shed new light on the experiences and difficulties facing many of the roughly 3 million stutterers in the United States. Host Neal Conan talks with speech pathologist Kristin Chmela and freelance writer Dan Slater about their struggles with stuttering and recent developments in how the condition is understood and treated.

Guitarist of 'OK Go' on the Changing Music Industry
It takes more than a well-packaged record and a major label to make it in the music business these days.  The Chicago-based band OK Go dropped their label, embraced the Internet, signed-up corporate sponsors and launched YouTube sensations including the video to "This Too Shall Pass" ... all while claiming greater artistic freedom and still making a few bucks in the process.  OK Go's lead singer and guitarist Damian Kulash, Jr. talks with host Neal Conan about the rewards and pitfalls of what he calls "the new rock star paradigm."

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